To tourney or not to tourney.

I'm not too good.  I struggle to keep 2000PP.  I find my self losing a lot in endless battle as well.  There's a local tournament comming up. I really like this game so I'm interested in going.  I just not too sure if I should enter.  I get the feeling i'd lose in the first round.  I'm curious as how it feels to play under that type of pressure.  The entry fee is not that bad.  What do you think?

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created Jun 8 '10 @ 3:23 by:


Responses (5 total)

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First, I would recommend not saying whether or not you are "good" or "bad".  It's not a validation or challenge to your ability, but having a positive attitude will help you to take losses more in stride.  This has the chain effect of allowing you to look at your losses more objectively which then allows you to learn from your mistakes.  This is one of the key attributes to becoming a better player.

Assuming the entry fee is not prohibitive for you, there is no reason you shouldn't enter the tournament.  While tournaments are definitely about finding out who the best is, there is a tremendous social aspect to them and you should have no problem finding people in your area with whom you can level up your game with.

Even if you go two and out (basically slang for two losses in a row in the beginning of the tournament), hang around, talk to players, ask them about things that you don't understand.  There's a real opportunity to learn here.

It's these interactions which really help form the basis of the fighting game community and a big reason we choose to be a part of it.

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created Jun 8 '10 @ 3:39 by:

casperOne ♦
Rep: 2159


Watching other players always helps. They know their own characters and you can learn how their characters react to each other. Go for it!

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created Jun 24 '10 @ 16:12 by:

baby.blanka
Rep: 21


I am also looking to get into tournaments and I would you are doing more things right than I am when it comes to matches seeing as I HAVE NEVER BEEN PAST 960+PP... I used to JUST main ibuki and now i have branched off into many other characters that is helping me learn the game more.

 

i think that once we start getting into the tournament scene and more often you will begin to improve. I see myself as a player that can do some adapting and learning my opponent and playing footsies but seeing as a majority of the online players use Ryu, Ken, Akuma, Dudley at least that is who i encounter the most. I tend to be able to play a good game and win or lose feel good about how I played except in the cases of Flowchart Kens, Zoning (actually Spamming, there is a fine line) Ryu's and Machine Gun Dudly's. Then when another character comes up I don't know the matchup and I don't know when to punish and what to punish with. I have not REAL local competition like friends that play and actually know the games mechanics so I can't learn much from them ... I just get old school button mash out combo'd to death.

 

i think knowing the Matchups for your character is the most Important part and the next thing inline after that is execution accuracy (mine sucks but i am working on it.) and after that is Using ALL the tools and moves that that your character has to offer so you can switch it up. maybe having drasticly different play styles for your character so that your opponent expects you to play the way you did in the first match and then you come out of the gate with a completely new tactic.

 

I could go on and on but these are just some of my thoughts.

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created Jun 8 '10 @ 19:37 by:

Cool3stNERD
Rep: 229


To speak from experience, I was in a similar place a few months back, with the opportunity to enter a local tournament despite knowing that I was still a low-level player. However, I found that entering the tournament was one of the best decisions I could have made -- the atmosphere at a tournament when money is on the line is electric, and even once you're eliminated (and you will be, unless you win it all :)) getting to hang out and watch matches with other fighting game enthusiasts is a lot of fun, and you might even make some new friends in the process.

I can't recommend it enough -- just go, and have fun, win or lose!

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created Jun 8 '10 @ 5:01 by:

Keres
Rep: 900


I would go for the social aspect. Meeting new players and future friends willing to help you out even a little bit can go a long way. Not sure if you should actually enter, but the getting to know the local scene is a big bonus. I'm sure if you make it clear that you have a lot of interest in getting into tournies someone will guide you. At least that has always been my experince. If the entry fee is really small though getting used to playing under pressure could help.

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created Jun 8 '10 @ 3:38 by:

Geo Holyhart
Rep: 209

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